Art Books of Historic Importance

“Feeling of brotherhood and uplifting spirit – love and respect.” ~ Cherel Ito 

Photographer Cherel Ito and photographer Edward Steichen were of the same ilk. Both knew how to capture through the lens of the camera, images of people all over the world that were unforgettable. Their photographs are a dream fulfilled for those trying to understand the connectivity between strangers in our world, called Earth. Their photography reminds us that as a country and people alone, we can do nothing but as a world we can do everything. All from one Creator, connected through the cosmos of human emotion. To read more about this phenomenon, please visit http://n.pr/7oRorT

The “coffee table book” Through the Lens of Her Camera so closely resembles the book The Family of Man, which was published in 1955 and is still sold today.  It, too, is bound to be considered another historical treasure among art photography books. 

Ito and Steichen’s photography were both heralded in exhibits in the greatest art museums of the world. Cherel Ito’s works remain in the permanent collection at the National Museum of Women in the Arts, and Edward Steichen’s images were displayed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City in the 1950s. 

To order your copy of a book of timeless, prized Cherel Ito images depicting our vast world and it’s people, please go to http://bit.ly/b4tHGl.

This image brought to you by www.throughthelensofhercamera.wordpress.com and www.cherelitobook.com and www.cherelito.com.

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This entry was posted in Africa, Art, art museums, Bolivia, cherel ito book, Current Event, education, Fulfilling Dreams, fulfillment, Haiti, history, history of film, Indian Nations, Libraries, Mexico, Morrocco, Nepal, Ozark Mountains, photographic journaling, photography, photography from around the world, portrait artists, portrait photographers, spiritual journeys, telling stories through photography, Through the Lens of Her Camera - Cherel Ito, Travel, Travel and Photography, women filmmakers, women in the arts, women photographers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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