Rooted in Musical History

He played his fiddle and I wept.” ~ Cherel Ito 

Much of the Ozark Mountain region is remote, and economically underserved. It is rich in musical history and in that geographical area of the country, much of the music is self-taught and aurally played. http://bit.ly/kgADNX

Fiddles, guitars, mandolins, juice harps, dulcimers and banjos, often handmade, are widely played by local musicians. There are few community gatherings that are devoid of musical entertainment. Neighborhood musicians play at pie suppers, barn dances, “pickin’ parties and on front porches of homes. Spur of the moment “jam sessions” of bluegrass, southern rock, jazz and gospel are a dream fulfilled for artists who wish to commune in music and fellowship. How sweet it is! 

Those who have never experienced life in rural America might wonder “why one would live in places so far off the beaten track?” When her photographic journeys led her to the Ozark Mountains in 1968, Cherel Ito went in search of replies to this question. The answers to the Ozark way of living and many other ways of life around the world are provided in both images and journal writings throughout Cherel’s book. Through the Lens of Her Camera is Cherel’s photographic legacy, about life, that she left behind. 

 “This is the kind of place that’s so down home

 I feel it inside of me.

 Roots that are deep are holding me. ~ Cherel Ito 

Cheryl ‘s “gift,” her ability to connect with people and their emotions, is so stunningly captured and communicated in each of the images in her book. What a beautiful depiction this is, of an Ozark Mountain man’s feelings of isolation and loneliness being assuaged by his love for his music. It would appear that he would play for anyone who would listen.

This blog brought to you by www.cherelitobook.com, www.cherelito.com and

www.throughthelensofhercamera.com.

Posted in and sociology, Art, art museums, art therapy, Cherel Ito, cherel ito book, economics, education, Fulfilling Dreams, fulfillment, history, Journal writing, Libraries, Louisiana, Mississippi, Multi-media, music, music of the Ozarks, music of the Ozarks, Ozark Mountains, Ozark Mountains, Ozark Mountains, Ozark Mountains, Ozark Musicians, photographic journaling, photography, photography, photography from around the world, portrait artists, portrait photographers, poverty, relationships, sociologicial studies through photography, spiritual journeys, telling stories through photography, through music, Through the Lens of Her Camera - Cherel Ito, Travel, Travel and Photography, Uncategorized, women in the arts, women photographers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Learning from the Elders

The beauty of simplicity – the simplicity of beauty.” ~ Cherel Ito 

One only needs to look at the face of this woman, distinguished by age, to know that she has accumulated a lifetime of wealth – of wisdom and knowledge about her people, the Native Americans Indians. It is apparent from the clutching of her yarn that Cherel Ito snapped this image, through the lens of her camera, as this woman was creating her art. The marks of time on her face tell us that the woman has probably been creating art for many decades. She is no doubt, a master of her craft. Art, for many past generations of Native Americans did not fulfill a dream of what they “wanted to be.” Rather, art was created out of sustainability and spirituality, as part of the fiber of their lives. 

The demise of Native American hand crafts, customs, folklore and traditions is of great concern to the elders of Native American people. Many feel responsibility to share and teach younger generations how to create Native American art and what life was like on Indian reservations during pioneering times. 

Out of the concern for the disappearance of native arts, the woman pictured has probably taught her children, grandchildren and community children how to shear a sheep, card and spin wool, and how to hand-dye yarn using natural resources such as berries, flowers, bark and roots. Throughout the seasons of her life, this woman most likely learned how to weave blanket, rugs and clothing too. 

The Native American Indians are deeply spiritual people, as was photographer Cherel Ito. This explains Cherel’s interest in seeking out tribes of Native American Indians throughout her photographic journeys. More of photographer Cherel Ito’s images capturing people in many places all over the globe can viewed by going to http://bit.ly/b4tHGl.

 This blog brought to you by www.cherelitobook.com, www.cherelito.com and www.throughthelensofhercamera.com.

Posted in and sociology, Art, capturing aging through photography, Cherel Ito, cherel ito book, Ecology, economics, education, Fulfilling Dreams, history, Indian Nations, Journal writing, Libraries, Multi-media, photographic journaling, photography, photography, photography from around the world, portrait artists, portrait photographers, poverty, relationships, senior citizens and elderly, sociologicial studies through photography, spiritual journeys, telling stories through photography, Through the Lens of Her Camera - Cherel Ito, Travel, Travel and Photography, women, women filmmakers, women in the arts, women photographers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Spiritual Stones

“Every minute is for observation and making connections.” ~ Cherel Ito 

Although there are no sandy beaches, theme parks or awe-inspiring mile high mountain vistas, the wailing wall is a place where millions of tourists flock to every year. The city of Old Jerusalem is a place to where many journey as part of a religious celebration of a son’s bar mitzvah or daughter’s bat mitzvah. 

The Western Wall, often referred to as the wailing wall, by non-Jewish observers who were accustomed to seeing Jewish people wailing in prayer at the wall, has been standing for more than two thousand years. All that remains of King Herrod’s Temple site, which was destroyed in 69 CE, is a wall of stones which is considered to be the holiest place in the world. Visitors come to pay spiritual homage to this site 365 days a year, 24 hours a day. Many leave their prayers on pieces of paper between the stones of the wall. For more information on this holy city, Old Jerusalem and the Western wall, please visit http://bit.ly/lyMw2x

Cherel Ito’s life was a quest to understand different cultures, people and diverse forms of spirituality. She fulfilled one of her dreams when visited the Western wall in 1965. As she witnessed women offering their prayers at this holy location, she captured images through the lens of her camera of those who have been said to be at the “Gateway to Heaven.” Like many of Cherel Ito’s photographs, no words are needed to explain the scene. Cherel had a magnificent gift for telling stories through images alone. She was a master at her craft of photographic journalism. To order Cherel’s book of museum quality photography, please visit www.throughthelensofhercamera.com.

 

 This photograph brought to you by www.cherelitobook.com and www.cherelito.com.

Posted in and sociology, Art, art museums, bar mitzvahs, bat mitzvahs, Cherel Ito, cherel ito book, Current Event, education, Fulfilling Dreams, fulfillment, international women's relations, Israel, Journal writing, Multi-media, photographic journaling, photography, photography, photography from around the world, portrait artists, portrait photographers, relationships, sociologicial studies through photography, spiritual journeys, telling stories through photography, Through the Lens of Her Camera - Cherel Ito, Travel, Travel and Photography, Uncategorized, women, women filmmakers, women in the arts, women photographers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

In Good Company

Such energy and peace and steady with life. The rhythms feel good” ~ Cherel Ito 

People travel in circles. Our careers, interests and hobbies, often determine our company of friends and associates. Our attraction to others can bring both positive and negative influences to our lives. Beautiful physical features of a person can attract others and leave men and women feeling as if their dream has been fulfilled when they set their eyes on that special someone.

A truly gifted portrait photographer has the ability to see beyond the surface to discover the inner spirit of a person. When character traits such as warmth, vitality, peace, compassion, verve or humility are exposed through the lens of a camera, a masterpiece is born! 

Housed inside the Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC are treasures of creativity from the 16th to the 20th century. The pieces of work that lie inside the walls of the museum are extraordinary showpieces from women in the arts who have had the ability to that go way beyond the ordinary. Creative interpretation of feelings, thoughts and ideas are translated into their craft. 

It is an important job for the curator of a museum to exhibit the prized collections so they are displayed and seen in the best light. In a museum dedicated to historic preservation of the best of the best, researching and compiling works of art is an enormous job. For more information on what it takes to be an art curator, please visit http://bit.ly/lAtQ6X

We do not know exactly what criteria the National Museum of Women in the Arts www.nmwa.org used to select Cherel Ito’s photography to be included in their collection. We do know that her photographic images are in the company of other celebrated and distinguished artists from around the world!

This blog brought to you by www.cherelitobook.com, www.throughthelensofhercamera.com and www.cherelito.com.

Posted in Art, art curation, art museums, Cherel Ito, cherel ito book, curation, education, Fulfilling Dreams, history, photographic journaling, photography, photography from around the world, portrait artists, portrait photographers, relationships, sociologicial studies through photography, telling stories through photography, Through the Lens of Her Camera - Cherel Ito, Travel and Photography, women filmmakers, women in the arts, women photographers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Nepal Rings in the Year 2068

I like wandering alone – my own time to discover and shoot pictures.” ~ Cherel Ito

Photographer and filmmaker, Cherel Ito, captured this image through the lens of her camera as she traveled through Nepal. According to the Gregorian calendar, the year was 1978. However, it is interesting to note that according to the Nepalese calendar, the year would have been 2034. The Nepal patro (traditional calendar) is approximately 56 years and 8 ½ months ahead of the time table that we follow here in theUnited States. Last week, in mid-April, the Nepalese people rang in the New Year of 2068. 

Cherel Ito was on her own personal schedule to learn all she could, in her life time, about people and cultures all over the globe. During the years 1978 to 1997 (according to the Gregorian calendar), Cherel visited many regions of the United States and many other countries as she fulfilled her dream of capturing portraits of people in societies that moved her. Sensitivity to issues important to her gender is reflected in much of her photography. It is for this reason her work is hailed as “an important contribution” to the growing collection of documentary photography at The National Museum of Women in the Arts. www.nmwa.org

In the forward of the book Through the Lens of Her Camera, Lani Hall Alpert wrote that Cherel and her husband Teiji’s journeys throughout Europe, Haiti and Nepal were in search to “capture the truth of what it means to be alive mapped across miles of faces.” 

What the journey means to be alive, is much different to a parent with a child with juvenile diabetes than to a parent with a healthy child. There is an independent film that shows the face of juvenile diabetes in Nepal. http://xnepali.com/movies/documentary-life-for-a-child/

Thankfully, in this Year of 2068 in Nepal, there is more hope that Nepalese children living a diabetic life can survive. Although for many, it is geographically difficult to obtain insulin and medical care. At least supplies have been made available to children of Nepal, thanks Rotary Clubs of Australia.

This blog brought to you by www.throughthelensofhercamera.com, www.cherelito.com, www.cherelitobook.com.

Posted in and sociology, Art, art museums, Cherel Ito, cherel ito book, Current Event, economics, education, filmmaking, Fulfilling Dreams, Independent filmmaking in Nepal, Medical aid, Medical aid for Juvenile diabetes in Nepal, Multi-media, Nepal, Nepalese New Year 2068, Non-profit aid to Nepal, photographic journaling, photography, photography, photography from around the world, portrait artists, portrait photographers, poverty, relationships, Rotary Australia and Nepal, sociologicial studies through photography, telling stories through photography, Through the Lens of Her Camera - Cherel Ito, Travel, Travel and Photography, women, women filmmakers, women in the arts, women photographers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Life from a Different Point of View

Truth in Haiti is like a kaleidoscope. It may appear one way, then suddenly shift.” ~
Cherel Ito

A few months ago, in the blog writing Mysterious Natural Disasters http://bit.ly/fSk9r0, life in Haiti today was compared with photo journalist Cherel Ito’s impressions of life there in 1975. Her descriptions of a place “so gentle and romantic” would in all probability be replaced today with words that include “international aid arriving daily.”

According to an article in Philanthropy Today, Associated Press reporter, Trenton Daniel, has exposed an additional issue, beyond the ramifications of natural disaster, of concern to the Haitian government. A matter of contention has come as a result of the outpouring of the generosity of relief charities that have arrived in the country of Haiti.

Jean-Max Bellerive, Haiti’s prime minister, has acknowledged that although the overwhelming support from NGOs has been fulfilling but it has resulted in a conundrum for the government of Haiti. There are few regulations and little supervision in place to deal with it. Thus procedures to use the aid most effectively are not in place. To read the full article on why Jean-Max Bellerive believes that steps need to examine closely Non-Governmental Organizations that are providing support to Haiti, please visit http://bit.ly/hl3k0S.

On May 14, there will be a shift of political power in Haiti. President-elect Michel Martelly will take over. His political platform includes goals to better control and account for foreign aid. Perhaps necessary regulations will be put into place so that the government of Haiti will be seen from a different point of view – as a country who efficiently used the aid of it’s friends and allies to build a better world for it’s people.

 This image brought to you by www.cherelito.com. www.throughthelensofhercamera.com, and www.cherelitobook.com.

Posted in Cherel Ito, cherel ito book, Current Event, ecological disasters, economics, education, foreign relations with Haiti, Haiti, Haiti, Haiti, Haiti Now and Then, NGOs in Haiti, Non profit aid to Haiti, photographic journaling, photography, photography from around the world, Political power in Haiti, relationships, sociologicial studies through photography, telling stories through photography, Through the Lens of Her Camera - Cherel Ito, Travel, Travel and Photography, U.S. and Haiti, use of relief support in Haiti, women in the arts, women photographers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

One-of-A-Kind Soul and Spirit

My photography is committed to ….unrehearsed moments of human expression.” ~Cherel Ito 

Cherel Ito’s work as a producer and editor in the filmmaking industry was a natural extension of her photography. Her interests led her to produce and edit films that many considered to be “off beat” or “avant-garde.” Even during an era of social activism and experimentation, her films about subjects such as voodoo ceremonies, anthropology and mythology were not of particular interest to the ordinary. Audiences with uncommon taste or progressive and visionary thinking were very interested in her work.

Cherel wandered the world, as a visionary, marveling and fulfilling her dream by studying differences in people and in culture. When she was engrossed in her film and photography work, she was absorbing as much as she could about mysteries of the family of mankind. 

She was, from all who knew her, a one-of-a-kind, in soul and spirit. Her photography goes far beyond photographic portraiture. She captured, through the lens of her camera, images that stir emotions and peak curiosity. They reveal the extraordinary and sensitive eye she had for capturing biographies of people through a single image. 

Ever the consummate artist, she edited her husband Teiji Ito’s musical soundtracks and created unique jewelry using primitive bones, crystals and beads. Cherel was a prodigious journal writer and reader and she created distinctive stationary paper and handcrafted books. 

Many would say Cherel was, perhaps, a bohemian. Great artistic talent is born out of  non-conformity. The most successful artists focus on finding different ways of presenting their Art.

For more information on the photography of Cherel Ito, please visit www.cherelito.com, www.cherelitobook.com, www.throughthelensofhercamera.com.

Posted in Africa, and sociology, Art, art museums, Bolivia, cherel ito book, education, filmmaking, Fulfilling Dreams, Greece, Haiti, history, history of film, Indian Nations, Japan, Journal writing, Mexico, Morrocco, Multi-media, Nepal, Ozark Mountains, photographic journaling, photography, photography, photography from around the world, portrait artists, portrait photographers, Portugal, sociologicial studies through photography, spiritual journeys, telling stories through photography, Through the Lens of Her Camera - Cherel Ito, Travel, Travel and Photography, women filmmakers, women in the arts, women photographers | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment